ARI Clinical Fellowship Program

The ARI Clinical Fellows program allows MD-trained fellows in infectious diseases or HIV/AIDS to spend time training in Ward 86 at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). As home to the nation's leading AIDS program, UCSF offers a unique opportunity for trainees to gain experience working with clinicians and researchers who have been involved in the epidemic since the beginning. The ARI provides fiscal backing to the fellowship as part of its mission to nurture the next generation of leaders. Many of UCSF’s extraordinary faculty have benefited from this well-established training experience, which deepens fellows’ clinical knowledge and skills in HIV medicine and helps them to grow into future leaders in the field.

ARI Clinical Fellows, 2016

Lillian Brown, MD, MPH 

Lillian Brown studied molecular biology and immunology at Harvard University. She completed an MD and a PhD in epidemiology at the University of North Carolina, where she studied HIV testing and linkage to care, monitoring antiretroviral treatment and diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections in resource-limited settings. For her dissertation she led a clinical trial of HIV partner notification in Lilongwe, Malawi. She moved to San Francisco for residency training in internal medicine at UCSF and joined the Division of HIV/AIDS at SFGH in July 2015. Here, Lillian researches the role of social networks in HIV testing, treatment and retention in care.

Angelo (Asa) Clemenzi-Allen, MD 

Asa Clemenzi-Allen attended the University of Massachusetts for his undergraduate (Amherst) and medical (Worcester) education. He moved to San Francisco in 2012 to complete his residency at UCSF. Asa is a second-year infectious disease fellow and is honored and thrilled to continue his training in Ward 86; he sees it as the perfect place to inform his research on health disparities of socioeconomically marginalized groups in the US healthcare system. Outside of medicine, Asa enjoys exploring the natural beauty and culture of the Bay Area and tries to stay engaged with local, national and international politics through reading and attending community events.

Shereen Katrak, MD, MPH

Shereen Katrak completed her internal medicine residency at Duke University Medical Center. Her research interests include the epidemiology of malaria and HIV co-infection, and characterizing the malaria parasite reservoir at different transmission intensities in Uganda. Her goal is to become an NIH-funded clinical investigator and to have a career that informs decisions about resource allocation in the developing world. She enjoys spending time with her family, swimming and hiking.

Michael Reid, MBChB

Michael Reid completed medical residencies in the UK at Imperial College and in New York at Montefiore Medical Center. Before starting as a fellow in infectious diseases at UCSF, he spent three years in Botswana as a clinician in the University of Pennsylvania’s PEPFAR program in Gaborone. His research interests include exploring the clinical and programmatic implications of the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases in HIV-prevalent settings. He plans to pursue an academic career back in Africa after completing his fellowship. Michael is married to Margo and father to Saoirse and Isla. He enjoys drinking tea and watching soccer.

Rachel Rutishauser, MD, PhD

Rachel Rutishauser received her undergraduate degree in biology at Harvard University. She completed an MD and a PhD in immunology at Yale University, where she studied the transcriptional regulation of CD8+ T cell differentiation in a mouse model of acute viral infection. She completed her internal medicine residency at UCSF and is currently a second-year infectious disease fellow at UCSF. In the translational immunology laboratory of Dr. Mike McCune, she studies the regulation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell exhaustion in HIV infection and the impact of persistent fetal immune responses on pediatric immunity.

ARI Clinical Fellows, 2015

Lillian Brown, MD, MPH

Lillian Brown studied molecular biology and immunology at Harvard University. She completed an MD and a PhD in epidemiology at the University of North Carolina, where she studied HIV testing and linkage to care, monitoring antiretroviral treatment, and diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections in resource-limited settings. For her dissertation she led a clinical trial of HIV partner notification in Lilongwe, Malawi. She moved to San Francisco for residency training in internal medicine at UCSF and joined the Division of HIV/AIDS at SFGH in July 2015. Here, Lillian researches the role of social networks in HIV testing, treatment and retention in care.

Catherine Koss, MD

Catherine Koss received her undergraduate degree in biochemical sciences from Harvard University and her medical degree from Northwestern. She completed training in internal medicine at UCSF, where she is currently a fellow in infectious diseases, and works at Ward 86 at ZSFG. In collaboration with the Makerere University–UCSF PROMOTE study team, she has analyzed predictors of viral suppression and risk factors for preterm delivery among women with HIV in rural Uganda and is involved in studies to reduce malaria and HIV in pregnant women and children. She also focuses on pre-exposure prophylaxis among HIV-uninfected women in the US.

Michael Reid, MBChB

Michael Reid completed medical residencies in the UK at Imperial College and in New York at Montefiore Medical Center. Before starting as a fellow in infectious diseases at UCSF, he spent three years in Botswana as a clinician in the University of Pennsylvania’s PEPFAR program in Gaborone. His research interests include exploring the clinical and programmatic implications of the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases in HIV-prevalent settings. He plans to pursue an academic career back in Africa after completing his fellowship. Michael is married to Margo and father to Saoirse and Isla. He enjoys drinking tea and watching soccer.

Monika Roy, MD

Monika Roy completed her undergraduate and medical education at the University of Southern California. She completed internal medicine training at Yale and went on to work at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where she served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer and then a medical epidemiologist within the Mycotic Diseases Branch. Monika’s current research is within the field of implementation sciences. She is currently working on projects evaluating the uptake and diffusion of evidence-based practices within global and domestic HIV care delivery under the mentorship of Dr. Elvin Geng. In her spare time, she enjoys hiking, traveling and cooking.